Submissions

Online Submissions

Already have a Username/Password for Journal of Communication and Behavioural Sciences?
Go to Login

Need a Username/Password?
Go to Registration

Registration and login are required to submit items online and to check the status of current submissions.

 

Author Guidelines

  • The papers shall be written entirely in English language;
  • The papers must have minimum 6 pages and maximum 20 pages in length and must comply exactly with the instructions bellow.
  • Papers which don’t comply with the formatting conditions described bellow will be returned to the authors and will only be taken into consideration for one last reviewing if they meet standards set.
  • The papers must be written clearly, concise, without any ambiguities.

 

Page Setup: Text margins: top – 2.54 cm; bottom – 2.54 cm; left – 2.54 cm; right – 2.54 cm; page format A4. The text will be written in single line spacing, justified alignment.

Format paragraph: All paragraphs should be setting Alignment - Justify, left – 0 cm, right – 0 cm, before – 0 pt, after – 0 pt, Special – First line – 1,27 cm.

 

 

Paper Structure and Formatting Details:

 

 

TITLE

(centered, bold, Times New Roman, 12, CAPS LOOK)

(SINGLE SPACE, Times News Roman, 11)

Name SURNAMEof the author (right, Times New Roman, bold, 9)

Email (right, Times New Roman, 8)

Affiliation (right, Times New Roman, 8)

 (DOUBLE SPACE, Times New Roman, 11)

 

Abstract (Times New Roman, bold, 9)

No more than 150 words. The abstract must clearly specify the purpose of the paper and the objectives pursued by the author by his/her study. To be written in Times New Roman, 9.

(Single space, Times New Roman, 11)

Key words (Times New Roman, bold, 9): five-six key words, defining the subject approached in the paper. To be written in Times New Roman, 9.

 

Introduction (Times New Roman, bold, 11)

(Single space, Times New Roman, 11)

The introduction shall have a page at the most, however not less than half a page. The text must provide answers for four questions. (1) What matter does the paper cover? (2) Why is the studied matter important? (3) How does the author intend to answer to this matter? (4) What is the relation between the paper and the already existent specialized literature? This introductory section shall be written clearly and any confusion in communicating the four answers might result in paper rejection. (Times New Roman, 11)

(DOUBLE SPACE, Times New Roman, 11)

 

Literature Review (Times New Roman, bold, 11)

(Single space, Times New Roman, 11)

This section must comprise referrals to specialized literature, compared against the paper’s subject, emphasizing the most important and relevant contributions on which the author will ground his/her argumentation. In the reviewing process there shall be taken into consideration the share of referrals to papers published in international journals recognized by the scientific community. This section must stress the fact that the author is familiar with the knowledge level in the studied area, that he/she has sufficient scientific training, allowing him/her to have a pertinent opinion over the studied issues. (Times New Roman, 11)

(DOUBLE SPACE, Times New Roman, 11)

 

Theoretical Background (Times New Roman, bold, 11)

(Single space, Times New Roman, 11)

This section presents (if the case) the used theoretical tools: models, calculation formula. Also, any potential statistic data will be referred to, as well as their source and processing manner. (Times New Roman, 11)

(DOUBLE SPACE, Times New Roman, 11)

 

Paper content (headline depending on the specific of the approach subject) (Times New Roman, bold, 11)

(Single space, Times New Roman, 11)

In this section (or set of sections, as the case might be) the author shall present and support the results he/she intents to communicate by means of the paper. The references to literature should be noted in the main text in 11 point Times New Roman font, in the following form: [Barr, 2012]; [Blake, 2006; Barr, 2008]; [Barr & Diamond, 2008]; [Casey et al., 2003]; [IMF, 2014]. Footnotes should be avoided. (Times New Roman, 11)

(DOUBLE SPACE, Times New Roman, 11)

 

Conclusions (Times New Roman, bold, 11)

(Single space, Times New Roman, 11)

The conclusions section shall cover three elements: (1) it shall summarize the main outcomes; (2) it shall undertake the implications of such outcomes; (3) suggestions for future researches. (Times New Roman, 11)

(DOUBLE SPACE, Times, 12)

 

References (Times New Roman, bold, 11)

References shall be written in accordance with the Chicago Manual of Style. The authors shall visit https://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/book/ed17/frontmatter/toc.html for rapid guidelines. (Times New Roman,11). References are mandatory. There are not accepted footnotes, but only endnotes where the case. 

List the references in alphabetical order at the end of the paper in the reference section as in the examples taken from Chicago Manual of Style:

Book

One author

1. Michael Pollan, The Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals (New York: Penguin, 2006), 99–100.

2. Pollan, Omnivore’s Dilemma, 3.

Pollan, Michael. The Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals. New York: Penguin, 2006.

Two or more authors

1. Geoffrey C. Ward and Ken Burns, The War: An Intimate History, 1941–1945 (New York: Knopf, 2007), 52.

2. Ward and Burns, War, 59–61.

Ward, Geoffrey C., and Ken Burns. The War: An Intimate History, 1941–1945. New York: Knopf, 2007.

For four or more authors, list all of the authors in the bibliography; in the note, list only the first author, followed by et al. (“and others”):

1. Dana Barnes et al., Plastics: Essays on American Corporate Ascendance in the 1960s . . .

2. Barnes et al., Plastics . . .

Editor, translator or compiler instead of author

1. Richmond Lattimore, trans., The Iliad of Homer (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1951), 91–92.

2. Lattimore, Iliad, 24.

Lattimore, Richmond, trans. The Iliad of Homer. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1951.

Editor, translator or compiler in addition to author

1. Gabriel García Márquez, Love in the Time of Cholera, trans. Edith Grossman (London: Cape, 1988), 242–55.

2. García Márquez, Cholera, 33.

García Márquez, Gabriel. Love in the Time of Cholera. Translated by Edith Grossman. London: Cape, 1988.

Chapter or other part of a book

1. John D. Kelly, “Seeing Red: Mao Fetishism, Pax Americana, and the Moral Economy of War,” in Anthropology and Global Counterinsurgency, ed. John D. Kelly et al. (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2010), 77.

2. Kelly, “Seeing Red,” 81–82.

Kelly, John D. “Seeing Red: Mao Fetishism, Pax Americana, and the Moral Economy of War.” In Anthropology and Global Counterinsurgency, edited by John D. Kelly, Beatrice Jauregui, Sean T. Mitchell, and Jeremy Walton, 67–83. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2010.

Chapter of an edited volume originally published elsewhere (as in primary sources)

1. Quintus Tullius Cicero, “Handbook on Canvassing for the Consulship,” in Rome: Late Republic and Principate, ed. Walter Emil Kaegi Jr. and Peter White, vol. 2 of University of Chicago Readings in Western Civilization, ed. John Boyer and Julius Kirshner (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1986), 35.

2. Cicero, “Canvassing for the Consulship,” 35.

Cicero, Quintus Tullius. “Handbook on Canvassing for the Consulship.” In Rome: Late Republic and Principate, edited by Walter Emil Kaegi Jr. and Peter White. Vol. 2 of University of Chicago Readings in Western Civilization, edited by John Boyer and Julius Kirshner, 33–46. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1986. Originally published in Evelyn S. Shuckburgh, trans., The Letters of Cicero, vol. 1 (London: George Bell & Sons, 1908).

Preface, foreword, introduction or similar part of a book

1. James Rieger, introduction to Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus, by Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1982), xx–xxi.

2. Rieger, introduction, xxxiii.

Rieger, James. Introduction to Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus, by Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, xi–xxxvii. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1982.

Book published electronically

If a book is available in more than one format, cite the version you consulted. For books consulted online, list a URL; include an access date only if one is required by your publisher or discipline. If no fixed page numbers are available, you can include a section title or a chapter or other number.

1. Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice (New York: Penguin Classics, 2007), Kindle edition.

2. Philip B. Kurland and Ralph Lerner, eds., The Founders’ Constitution (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1987), accessed February 28, 2010, http://press-pubs.uchicago.edu/founders/.

3. Austen, Pride and Prejudice.

4. Kurland and Lerner, Founder’s Constitution, chap. 10, doc. 19.

Austen, Jane. Pride and Prejudice. New York: Penguin Classics, 2007. Kindle edition.

Kurland, Philip B., and Ralph Lerner, eds. The Founders’ Constitution. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1987. Accessed February 28, 2010. http://press-pubs.uchicago.edu/founders/.

Journal article

Article in a print journal

In a note, list the specific page numbers consulted, if any. In the bibliography, list the page range for the whole article.

1. Joshua I. Weinstein, “The Market in Plato’s Republic,” Classical Philology 104 (2009): 440.

2. Weinstein, “Plato’s Republic,” 452–53.

Weinstein, Joshua I. “The Market in Plato’s Republic.” Classical Philology 104 (2009): 439–58.

Article in an online journal

Include a DOI (Digital Object Identifier) if the journal lists one. A DOI is a permanent ID that, when appended to http://dx.doi.org/ in the address bar of an Internet browser, will lead to the source. If no DOI is available, list a URL. Include an access date only if one is required by your publisher or discipline.

1. Gueorgi Kossinets and Duncan J. Watts, “Origins of Homophily in an Evolving Social Network,” American Journal of Sociology 115 (2009): 411, accessed February 28, 2010, doi:10.1086/599247.

2. Kossinets and Watts, “Origins of Homophily,” 439.

Kossinets, Gueorgi, and Duncan J. Watts. “Origins of Homophily in an Evolving Social Network.” American Journal of Sociology 115 (2009): 405–50. Accessed February 28, 2010. doi:10.1086/599247.

Article in a newspaper or popular magazine

Newspaper and magazine articles may be cited in running text (“As Sheryl Stolberg and Robert Pear noted in a New York Times article on February 27, 2010, . . .”) instead of in a note, and they are commonly omitted from a bibliography. The following examples show the more formal versions of the citations. If you consulted the article online, include a URL; include an access date only if your publisher or discipline requires one. If no author is identified, begin the citation with the article title.

1. Daniel Mendelsohn, “But Enough about Me,” New Yorker, January 25, 2010, 68.

2. Sheryl Gay Stolberg and Robert Pear, “Wary Centrists Posing Challenge in Health Care Vote,” New York Times, February 27, 2010, accessed February 28, 2010, http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/28/us/politics/28health.html.

3. Mendelsohn, “But Enough about Me,” 69.

4. Stolberg and Pear, “Wary Centrists.”

Mendelsohn, Daniel. “But Enough about Me.” New Yorker, January 25, 2010.

Stolberg, Sheryl Gay, and Robert Pear. “Wary Centrists Posing Challenge in Health Care Vote.” New York Times, February 27, 2010. Accessed February 28, 2010. http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/28/us/politics/28health.html.

Book review

1. David Kamp, “Deconstructing Dinner,” review of The Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals, by Michael Pollan, New York Times, April 23, 2006, Sunday Book Review, http://www.nytimes.com/2006/04/23/books/review/23kamp.html.

2. Kamp, “Deconstructing Dinner.”

Kamp, David. “Deconstructing Dinner.” Review of The Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals, by Michael Pollan. New York Times, April 23, 2006, Sunday Book Review. http://www.nytimes.com/2006/04/23/books/review/23kamp.html.

Thesis or dissertation

1. Mihwa Choi, “Contesting Imaginaires in Death Rituals during the Northern Song Dynasty” (PhD diss., University of Chicago, 2008).

2. Choi, “Contesting Imaginaires.”

Choi, Mihwa. “Contesting Imaginaires in Death Rituals during the Northern Song Dynasty.” PhD diss., University of Chicago, 2008.

Paper presented at a meeting or conference

1. Rachel Adelman, “ ‘Such Stuff as Dreams Are Made On’: God’s Footstool in the Aramaic Targumim and Midrashic Tradition” (paper presented at the annual meeting for the Society of Biblical Literature, New Orleans, Louisiana, November 21–24, 2009).

2. Adelman, “Such Stuff as Dreams.”

Adelman, Rachel. “ ‘Such Stuff as Dreams Are Made On’: God’s Footstool in the Aramaic Targumim and Midrashic Tradition.” Paper presented at the annual meeting for the Society of Biblical Literature, New Orleans, Louisiana, November 21–24, 2009.

Website

A citation to website content can often be limited to a mention in the text or in a note (“As of July 19, 2008, the McDonald’s Corporation listed on its website . . .”). If a more formal citation is desired, it may be styled as in the examples below. Because such content is subject to change, include an access date or, if available, a date that the site was last modified.

1. “Google Privacy Policy,” last modified March 11, 2009, http://www.google.com/intl/en/privacypolicy.html.

2. “McDonald’s Happy Meal Toy Safety Facts,” McDonald’s Corporation, accessed July 19, 2008, http://www.mcdonalds.com/corp/about/factsheets.html.

3. “Google Privacy Policy.”

4. “Toy Safety Facts.”

Google. “Google Privacy Policy.” Last modified March 11, 2009. http://www.google.com/intl/en/privacypolicy.html.

McDonald’s Corporation. “McDonald’s Happy Meal Toy Safety Facts.” Accessed July 19, 2008. http://www.mcdonalds.com/corp/about/factsheets.html.

Blog entry or comment

Blog entries or comments may be cited in running text (“In a comment posted to The Becker-Posner Blog on February 23, 2010, . . .”) instead of in a note, and they are commonly omitted from a bibliography. The following examples show the more formal versions of the citations. There is no need to add pseud. after an apparently fictitious or informal name. (If an access date is required, add it before the URL; see examples elsewhere in this guide.)

1. Jack, February 25, 2010 (7:03 p.m.), comment on Richard Posner, “Double Exports in Five Years?,” The Becker-Posner Blog, February 21, 2010, http://uchicagolaw.typepad.com/beckerposner/2010/02/double-exports-in-five-years-posner.html.

2. Jack, comment on Posner, “Double Exports.”

Becker-Posner Blog, The. http://uchicagolaw.typepad.com/beckerposner/.

E-mail or text message

E-mail and text messages may be cited in running text (“In a text message to the author on March 1, 2010, John Doe revealed . . .”) instead of in a note, and they are rarely listed in a bibliography. The following example shows the more formal version of a note.

1. John Doe, e-mail message to author, February 28, 2010.

Item in a commercial database

For items retrieved from a commercial database, add the name of the database and an accession number following the facts of publication. In this example, the dissertation cited above is shown as it would be cited if it were retrieved from ProQuest’s database for dissertations and theses.

Choi, Mihwa. “Contesting Imaginaires in Death Rituals during the Northern Song Dynasty.” PhD diss., University of Chicago, 2008. ProQuest (AAT 3300426).

 

 

GRAPHS AND TABLES

 

Along the paper’s content, the author may use graphs and tables but not more than four for a small paper and for every each of them it should be provided the number, title and source of origin. Also, author has to be precise regarding years and unit measures (where it is needed).

As an example:

 

For graphs

(SINGLE SPACE , before graph, Times New Roman, 11

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(SINGLE SPACE , after graph, Times, 12)

 (Graph title, Center, Times New Roman, bold, 10)

Source: (center, Times New Roman, 9)

(SINGLE SPACE , Times New Roman, 11)

 

 

For tables

(SINGLE SPACE , before graph, Times New Roman, 11)

Table title, Center, Times New Roman, bold, 10)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(SINGLE SPACE , Times New Roman, 11)

Source: (center, Times New Roman, 9)

(SINGLE SPACE , Times New Roman, 11)

 

Submission Preparation Checklist

As part of the submission process, authors are required to check off their submission's compliance with all of the following items, and submissions may be returned to authors that do not adhere to these guidelines.

  1. The submission has not been previously published, nor is it before another journal for consideration (or an explanation has been provided in Comments to the Editor).
  2. The submission file is in OpenOffice, Microsoft Word, RTF, or WordPerfect document file format.
  3. Where available, URLs for the references have been provided.
  4. The text is single-spaced; uses a 12-point font; employs italics, rather than underlining (except with URL addresses); and all illustrations, figures, and tables are placed within the text at the appropriate points, rather than at the end.
  5. The text adheres to the stylistic and bibliographic requirements outlined in the Author Guidelines, which is found in About the Journal.
  6. If submitting to a peer-reviewed section of the journal, the instructions in Ensuring a Blind Review have been followed.
 

Privacy Statement

The names and email addresses entered in this journal site will be used exclusively for the stated purposes of this journal and will not be made available for any other purpose or to any other party.